Welcome

Here, you’ll learn a lot about colorectal cancer and antiangiogenic treatments for CRC. Empower yourself to take an active role in your fight against colorectal cancer. Use these resources to take part in your care today—for yourself and for your loved ones.

Patient Brochure

For patients with advanced CRC, various treatment options have been introduced in the past decade that have been shown to increase life expectancy. You can take an active role in understanding your condition in order to work efficiently with your healthcare team.
 
This brochure will guide you, as a patient with CRC, in understanding your condition. We want to help you play an active role in your treatment.
 

Medical Report

Update on Antiangiogenic Therapy for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer
 
Developed and published by the Angiogenesis Foundation, this document is a peer-reviewed, professional e-publication designed to give physicians and nurses state-of-the-art information and expert perspectives on recent-breaking clinical data and new concepts in antiangiogenic colorectal cancer treatment and clinical trials. Its unique format incorporates clear and concisely written text and infographics. Striking digital 3-D illustrations highlight the steps of tumor angiogenesis at the organ, cell, and molecular levels.
 

If you would like to receive CME credit for this report, please visit CME Online

Science of CRC Infographic

We invite you to download or print the Science of CRC’s Tumor Angiogenesis in Colorectal Cancer Infographic in PDF format.
 
PosterPreviewCRC
 
Download the Science of CRC Tumor Angiogenesis Infographic

mCRC Latin America White Paper

We invite you to download or print the Angiogenesis Foundation’s International Expert Summit White Paper “Improving Outcomes in the Treatment and Management of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer in Latin America” as a PDF.

WhitePaperPreviewLatamDownload mCRC Latin America Expert Summit Whitepaper

  
Click the flags below for available translations. 
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mCRC International White Paper

We invite you to download or print the Angiogenesis Foundation’s International Expert Summit White Paper on mCRC as a PDF.

WhitePaperPreviewCRCIntlDownload mCRC International Expert Summit Whitepaper

mCRC US National White Paper

We invite you to download or print the Angiogenesis Foundation’s US National Expert Summit White Paper on mCRC as a PDF.

WhitePaperPreviewCRCusaDownload mCRC US National Expert Summit Whitepaper

mCRC Treatments Guide

This interactive tool lists the possible therapies and treatments you may need to discuss with your doctor according to the stage of your disease progression. Follow the directions to see which treatments may be best options for you.

Social Media

Let’s raise awareness about this disease, which affects so many lives. Join our supportive online communities, part of our System ENABLE™, and become an advocate for all who are touched by CRC.

 

Other Resources

Advocacy and Information:
 
National Cancer Institute: Colon and Rectal Cancer
The National Cancer Institute coordinates the National Cancer Program, which conducts and supports research, training, health information dissemination, and other programs with respect to the cause, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of cancer, rehabilitation from cancer, and the continuing care of cancer patients and the families of cancer patients. 

 
National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Patient Guidelines
The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®), a not-for-profit alliance of 23 of the world’s leading cancer centers. The NCCN is dedicated to improving the quality and effectiveness of care provided to patients with cancer. 

 
Colon Cancer Alliance (CCA)
The Colon Cancer Alliance (CCA) is a community that provides hope and support to patients and their families while saving lives through screening, access, awareness, advocacy and research.

 
Fight Colorectal Cancer
Fight Colorectal Cancer is a leading national colorectal cancer advocacy organization empowering survivors to raise their voices, training advocates around the country, and educating lawmakers and pushing them for better policies.

 
American College of Gastroenterology Patient Resources
More than 9,000 physicians from 75 countries are members of the American College of Gastroenterology. The college’s Patient Information website offers information about colon cancer and other GI diseases, a list of questions to ask about colonoscopy, links to other patient support and education sites, and a physician locator tool.

 
American Cancer Society
The American Cancer Society (ACS) is a nationwide, community-based health organization that supports cancer research, education, advocacy, and service.
 
 

Clinical Trial Resources:
 
ClinicalTrials.gov
A service of the U.S. National Institutes of Health – ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry and results database of publicly and privately supported clinical studies of human participants conducted around the world. 
 
National Cancer Institute Cancer Clinical Trials Factsheet
 
Clinical Trial Matching Service by Phone: 866-278-0392
Monday through Friday, 8:30am–6:30pm ET.
Powered by a collaboration of the Colon Cancer Alliance, Fight Colorectal Cancer, and EmergingMed
 
 

Videos, Podcasts, Webinars:
 
Fight Colorectal Cancer Monthly Webinar
Fight Colorectal Cancer offers free patient webinars on the third Wednesday of every month from 8 – 9:30pm Eastern Time.
 
MD Anderson Cancer Center Colorectal Cancer Videos and Podcasts
 
American Cancer Society Colorectal Cancer Videos
 
Beaumont Hospital’s Ask the Doctor Webinar – Everything You Wanted to Know about Avoiding Colon Cancer
 
The Visual MD Colorectal Cancer videos
 
 

Apps:
 
Colonoscopy Guide: What to Expect
This is a free application that educates people about the importance of a colonoscopy and what to expect before, during, and after the exam.
 
Cancer Coach
My Cancer Coach, developed in partnership with BreastCancer.org and Fight Colorectal Cancer, is a free mobile tool, designed for cancer patients, to provide specific information about personalized cancer treatment options and to help manage your cancer journey.
 
 

General Helplines:
 
Colon Cancer Alliance (CCA) toll-free Helpline: 877 422 2030
 
Fight Colorectal Cancer toll-free Answer Line: 877 427 2111
 
American Cancer Society toll-free: 800 227 2345
 
American College of Gastroenterology: 1 301 263 9000

Glossary

 
Adenoma
The most common type of polyp or growth, typically benign and of glandular structure.1

 
Adjuvant Treatment
Treatment received after the main form of treatment to lower the risk of the cancer coming back.

 
Angiogenesis
The growth of new capillary blood vessels from existing blood vessels.

 
Angiogenesis Inhibitors
Drugs designed to target and interfere with the tumor blood supply, ultimately starving cancer cells.

 
Antiangiogenic Treatment
Treatment that controls disease by stopping new abnormal blood vessels from forming.

 
Anti-EGFR
Treatment that targets epidermal growth factor receptor signaling.

 
Anti-VEGF Therapy
Treatment designed to reduce function of VEGF, which causes new blood vessels to form.

 
Apoptosis
Condition when cells are unable to grow and ultimately self-destruct.

 
Barium Enema
Common test used to diagnose colorectal cancer using x-rays and dye to visualize the colon on a film.

 
Benign
Non-cancerous tissue that lacks the ability to spread to other parts of the body.

 
Bevacizumab (Avastin®)
A fully humanized monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). It is an antiangiogenic agent that is injected slowly as a liquid intravenously (into a vein).2

 
Biomarker
A characteristic of a certain cancer type that can help make decisions about which treatments should be used.3

 
Bowel
Intestines, gut.4

 
CapeOX
A combination of Oxaliplatin and Capecitabine, which is taken orally for 14 days and repeated every 3 weeks.

 
Capecitabine (Xeloda®)
An antimetabolite chemotherapy agent that is taken orally, in pill form.5

 
Cetuximab (Erbitux®)
A monoclonal antibody that targets endothelial growth factor receptor (EGFR). It is a liquid that is injected slowly intravenously (into a vein).6

 
Chemotherapy
The use of chemical agents (i.e. drugs) to treat or control cancer by attacking cancer cells.7

 
Clinical Trial
Medical study with human volunteers to test, assess and compare the safety and efficacy of treatments.

 
Colectomy
Surgery performed to remove part of the colon.

 
Colon
The first four to five feet of the large intestine.

 
Colonoscope
Thin, long tube with a light and camera that is used to examine the inner wall of the colon and rectum.

 
Colonoscopy
A procedure in which a gastroenterologist examines the inner lining of the colon and rectum for colorectal cancer by inserting a colonoscope through the rectum.8

 
Colostomy
A procedure post-surgery in which the colon is rerouted to an opening in the abdomen called a stoma.9

 
Combination Therapy
The use of two or more drugs/therapies to treat a condition more aggressively.

 
Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF)
A small protein that stimulates cell growth, proliferation and differentiation by binding to its receptor on the cell surface.10

 
Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)
A cell surface receptor of endothelial growth factor (EGF) that is often over-expressed on cancer cells and contributes to tumor development and growth.

 
Epithelial Cells
Cells that line the cavities or surfaces of organs.11

 
Fluorouracil (5-FU)
A liquid antimetabolite chemotherapy agent that is injected intravenously (into a vein).12

 
Floxuridine
A liquid antimetabolite chemotherapy agent that is injected intra-arterially (into an artery).13

 
FOLFIRI
A combination of Irinotecan, Leucovorin and 5-FU. It is injected intravenously and is repeated every 2 weeks.

 
FOLFOX
A combination of Oxaliplatin, Leucovorin and 5-FU. It is injected intravenously continuous infusion and is repeated every 2 weeks.

 
Irinotecan Hydrochloride
Irinotecan (Camptosar®) is a liquid topoisomerase I inhibitor chemotherapy agent that is injected intravenously (into a vein).14

 
KRAS
(Pronounced kay-rass) A biomarker gene that is often mutated in CRC. Its mutation status determines the kind of treatment a patient would respond to best.15

 
Leucovorin Calcium
Leucovorin is a folic acid analog that works by increasing the effects of 5-fluorouracil. Leucovorin comes as a liquid and is injected intravenously or into a muscle.16

 
Levoleucovorin
A folic acid analog that works by increasing the effects of 5-fluorouracil. Leucovorin comes as a liquid and is injected intravenously.17

 
Line of Therapy
A sequence of treatment that ensues when one line of therapy is ineffective.

 
Lymph Nodes
Small structures connected by lymph vessels in which immune cells can filter harmful substances and help fight infections.18

 
Lymph Vessels
Thin tubes, similar to blood vessels, that transport fluid containing various cell types and debris throughout the body.19

 
mFOLFOX 
A modified combination of Oxaliplatin, Leucovorin and 5-FU. It is injected intravenously continuous infusion and is repeated every 2 weeks.

 
Malignant
The ability of cancer cells to invade surrounding tissue and spread to other parts of the body.

 
Metastasis
The spread of cancer to other parts of the body.20

 
Microenvironment
The tissue around the cancer/tumor.

 
Neoadjuvant Therapy
Treatment that is given initially to facilitate the main therapy. This may include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or hormone therapy given before surgery to shrink a tumor so that it is easier to remove.21

 
Oxaliplatin (Eloxatin®)
A liquid platinum-containing chemotherapy that is injected intravenously.22

 
Panitumumab (Vectibix®)
A monoclonal antibody that targets endothelial growth factor receptor (EGFR). It is injected slowly as a liquid (into a vein).23

 
Polyp
A tissue growth in the inner lining of the colon or rectum that is benign (non-cancerous) but can become cancerous.

 
Primary Tumor
Original tumor; tumor in the organ from which cancer originates.

 
Radiation Therapy
Therapy that kills cancer cells with high-energy rays.

 
Rectum
The last seven inches of the large intestine.

 
Recurrence
When cancer returns after a period of time when no cancer could be detected.

 
Regorafenib (Stivarga®)
An oral tumour deactivation agent that potently blocks multiple protein kinases, including kinases involved in tumour angiogenesis (VEGFR1, -2, -3, TIE2), oncogenesis (KIT, RET, RAF-1, BRAF, BRAFV600E), and the tumour microenvironment (PDGFR, FGFR). It is given as a pill.24

 
Relapse
When cancer returns after initially responding to therapy.

 
Risk Factor
Any factor that affects your chance of getting a disease.25

 
Serrated Polyp
A type of polyp that has a saw-like shape and is typically benign.

 
Systemic Therapy
Treatment that travels throughout the entire body.

 
Staging
The process doctors use to identify the extent and location of the cancer, including whether it has spread to other areas in the body.

 
Stoma
An opening that is created in the abdomen for the excretion of stool in cases where reconnecting the healthy sections of the colon and rectum is not possible.

 
Targeted Therapy
Therapy that is designed to attack specific cell pathways that promote tumor growth.

 
TNM Classification
The most common system used to identify the stage of CRC26 using information about the size and extent of the cancer.

 
Tumor
An abnormal tissue growth that may be either benign or malignant and arises from uncontrolled proliferation of cells.27

 
Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor
Therapy that targets a wide range of cell signals important to colorectal cancer, angiogenesis and supporting cells in the tumor environment.28

 
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF)
Protein that causes new, abnormal blood vessels to form through the process of angiogenesis.

 
Virtual Colonoscopy
Test that uses multiple CT images to create a picture of the inner walls of the colon.

 
Ziv-Aflibercept (ZALTRAP®)
A fusion protein made from the VEGF-binding domains from VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 linked to the Fc portion of IgG, which binds VEGF-A, VEGF-B and PlGF and prevents their interaction with VEGFR-1 and -2. It is an antiangiogenic agent that is injected slowly as a liquid intravenously (into a vein).29
 

References
 
1  “Adenoma.” MedlinePlus. Merriam-Webster, Inc., N.d. Web. 2 May 2013. <http://www.merriam-webster.com/medlineplus/adenoma>.

 
2  “Bevacizumab Injection.” MedlinePlus. AHFS® Consumer Medication Information, 25 March 2013. Web. 1 May 2013. <http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/meds/a607001.html>.

 
3  Metastatic Colorectal Cancer and KRAS Gene Testing. CancerCare, N.d. Web. 5 March 2013. <http://www.cancercare.org/publications/91-metastatic_colorectal_cancer_and_kras_gene_testing>.

 
4  “Bowel.” MedlinePlus. Merriam-Webster, Inc., N.d. Web. 5 March 2013. <http://www.merriam-webster.com/medlineplus/bowel>.

 
5  “Capecitabine.” MedlinePlus. AHFS® Consumer Medication Information, 25 March 2013. Web. 1 May 2013. <http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/meds/a699003.html>.

 
6  “Cetuximab Injection.” MedlinePlus. AHFS® Consumer Medication Information, N.d. Web. 1 May 2013. <http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/meds/a607041.html>.

 
7  “Learning about Chemotherapy Treatment: What is chemotherapy and how does it work?” American Cancer Society, 17 March 2011. Web. 11 Jan. 2013. <http://www.cancer.org/treatment/treatmentsandsideeffects/treatmenttypes/chemotherapy/understandingchemotherapyaguideforpatientsandfamilies/understanding-chemotherapy-learning-what-is-it-how-it-works>.

 
8  “National Cancer Institute Fact Sheet: Colorectal Cancer Screening (PDQ®).” National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health. National Cancer Institute, 19 July 2012. Web. 11 Jan. 2013. <http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/screening/colorectal/patient/page3#Keypoint10>.

 
9  Ibid.

 
10  “Epidermal Growth Factor.” MedlinePlus. Merriam-Webster, Inc., N.d. Web. 5 March 2013. <http://www.merriam-webster.com/medlineplus/Epidermal%20Growth%20Factor>.

 
11  National Cancer Institute. National Institutes of Health, N.d. Web. 5 March 2013. <http://www.cancer.gov/common/popUps/popDefinition.aspx?term=adenoma>.

 
12  “Fluorouracil Injection.” MedlinePlus. AHFS® Consumer Medication Information, 25 March 2013. Web. 1 May 2013. <http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/meds/a682708.html>.

 
13  “Floxuridine.” MedlinePlus. AHFS® Consumer Medication Information, 25 March 2013. Web. 1 May 2013. <http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/meds/a682006.html>.

 
14  “Irinotecan injection.” MedlinePlus. AHFS® Consumer Medication Information, 25 March 2013. Web. 1 May 2013. <http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/meds/
a608043.html
>.

 
15  Metastatic Colorectal Cancer and KRAS Gene Testing. CancerCare, N.d. Web. 5 March 2013. <http://www.cancercare.org/publications/91-metastatic_colorectal_cancer_and_kras_gene_testing>.

 
16  “Leucovorin Injection.” MedlinePlus. AHFS® Consumer Medication Information, 25 March 2013. Web. 1 May 2013. <http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/meds/a608038.html>.

 
17  “Levoleucovorin Injection.” MedlinePlus. AHFS® Consumer Medication Information, 25 March 2013. Web. 1 May 2013. <http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/meds/a608044.html>.

 
18  “Lymph Nodes and Cancer: What is the lymph system?” American Cancer Society, Inc., 15 September 2011. Web. 5 March 2013. <http://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancerbasics/lymph-nodes-and-cancer>.

 
19  Ibid.

 
20  “What is colorectal cancer?” American Cancer Society, Inc., 17 Jan 2013. Web. 5 March 2013. <“http://www.cancer.org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/detailedguide/colorectal-cancer-what-is-colorectal-cancer>.

 
21  “Treatment.” Cancer.Net. American Society of Clinical Oncology, N.d. Web. 5 March 2013. <http://www.cancer.net/publications-and-resources/support-and-resource-links/general-cancer-organizations-and-resources/medical-dictionary-resources/treatment>.

 
22  “Oxaliplatin Injection.” MedlinePlus. AHFS® Consumer Medication Information, 25 March 2013. Web. 1 May 2013. <http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/meds/a607035.html>.

 
23  “Panitumumab Injection.” MedlinePlus. AHFS® Consumer Medication Information, 25 March 2013. Web. 1 May 2013. <http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/meds/a607066.html>.

 
24  “Regorafenib.” MedlinePlus. AHFS® Consumer Medication Information, 25 March 2013. Web. 1 May 2013. <http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/meds/a613004.html>.

 
25  “What are the risk factors for colorectal cancer?” American Cancer Society, Inc., 17 Jan. 2013. Web. 5 March 2013. <http://www.cancer.org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/detailedguide/colorectal-cancer-risk-factors>.

 
26  “National Cancer Institute Fact Sheet: Cancer Staging.” National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health. National Cancer Institute, 22 Sept. 2010. Web. 11 Jan. 2013. <http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/detection/staging>.

 
27  “Tumor.” MedlinePlus. Merriam-Webster, Inc., N.d. Web. 5 March 2013. <http://www.merriam-webster.com/medlineplus/tumor>.

 
28  “New Treatment for Advanced Colorectal Cancer Approved.” NCI Cancer Bulletin. 9.19 (2012) National Cancer Institute. Web. 18 Jan. 2013. <http://www.cancer.gov/ncicancerbulletin/100212/page11#b>.

 
29  “Ziv-aflibercept Injection.” MedlinePlus. AHFS® Consumer Medication Information, 25 March 2013. Web. 1 May 2013. <http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/meds/a613003.html>.